Science policy advocate interview

John Dupuis, over at Confessions of a Science Librarian, has been running email interviews with our iPolitics science policy series group. The most interesting questions, for me, was “…how [did you end] up involved in science advocacy? How do you define advocacy and what’s been the focus of your advocacy activities?” This was difficult to…

Canada and Water: Destroying our Cultural Foundations

The disconnect between government policies and public opinion is hardly newsworthy, but it seems the divide has reached Grand Canyon proportions around Canadian environmental issues, particularly water. I (finally) got around to reading my latest issue of Canadian Geographic, which had a brief interview with Ed Burtynsky. He’s a Canadian photographer who this fall debuted…

Stirring the Hornet’s Nest

On Monday I published an op-ed over at iPolitics, looking at Leona Aglukkaq’s record as both Health Minister and head of the Arctic Council to glean some understanding of how she might fare in the Environment portfolio. The outcome wasn’t overly positive. I guess her media team was paying attention, because today they took issue…

Canadian science communication takes off

The topics I follow most closely on Twitter are #cdnpoli, #cdnsci, and #scicomm. A lot of news from the first two has been pretty negative lately, and some days I have to stop reading because I just can’t shake my sense of doom at the direction in which our country is headed. The last topic,…

A Vast & Sparsely Populated Country

(Edited 18 Nov 2012) Earlier this week, Margaret Munro from the Postmedia Network reported that one of Canada’s recent superstar hires – a Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC) in diabetes research from the UK – is ditching the program and heading back home. I have to admit I cheered as I read this. Not because…