4Aug2014

Guest blog posts for CSP and CSWA

This past week I blogged about the Mount Polley mine disaster, an event that I think we won’t hear the end of anytime soon as clean up (hopefully) gets underway. At the same time that I posted that blog, I also had a couple of guest posts go up. The first was at the Canadian…

salmon2

The Mt Polley mine disaster

At two am on the morning of 4 August, 2014, a tailings pond at Imperial Metals’ Mount Polley gold and copper mine broke through an earthen dam, sending 10 million cubic metres of tailings water and 4.5 cubic meters of tailings sediment pouring into Polley Lake and from there through Hazeltine Creek into Quesnel Lake.…

OysterPoint

I see spring

Living in a landscape as dynamic as the West Coast, you can’t avoid the heady drama of the region’s seasonal cycles. On this the third day of spring, the neighbours have been burning brush fallen on their property during the many winter storms, and the scent of woodsmoke is thick in the air. The market…

BlogHeader13Feb_b-

Science communication challenge – accepted

This week I wrote up the last of my guest posts for Canadian Science Publishing’s blog. The first two – Scientific Societies in the Internet Age and What is this Science Communication You Speak Of? – have proven surprisingly popular, while a fourth on citizen science is in the pipeline. These posts were relatively easy…

dendriticdrainage_LittleTribuneBay_Hornby

Fluvial geomorphology is not dead

For those of you wondering WTH fluvial geomorphology means, it’s the study of river/stream processes and the landforms they create. Ben Hayes, the director of the Susquehanna River Initiative, has a nice description of it on his webpage, while Dave Sauchyn at the University of Regina has a comprehensive summary of the processes fluvial geomorphology…