L is for Lag time

For the letter H, I posted about the hydrograph – a deceptively simple plot that represents the complex integration of the many processes that occur across a watershed to generate streamflow. Lag times are a key feature of hydrographs that help us better understand how a watershed functions. But let’s not limit ourselves to just…

H is for Hydrograph

The hydrograph is a time series plot of water flow in a river, and is to hydrology what a symphony is to classical music. It pulls all the different processes that happen in a watershed together into one single composition that sings the watershed’s ‘story’. These two pictures both show a hydrograph, but from different…

F is for Facts

Fact (n): any observation that has been repeatedly confirmed and accepted as true; any scientific observation that has not been refutedScientists love their facts. Or should I say: as a scientist I love my facts. Facts make up the skeleton of science, the bone structure that we flesh out with hypotheses and ultimately theories. Facts mark…

E is for Ecohydrology

Studies of ecohydrology – also called hydroecology – started in the 80s, but weren't necessarily labelled as such until the 90s. The Versita journal Ecohydrology & Hydrobiology started in 2000, while the Wiley journal Ecohydrology started in 2008 – neither has a shortage of submissions. But what exactly does ecohydrology mean? I used to think…

B is for Beetle

When I hear the word ‘beetle’ I automatically think of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae): Much of my research in the past 6 years has focused on the effects of mountain pine beetle (MPB) on forest structure, and the subsequent impacts on snow accumulation and melt under the forest canopy. And since large areas of…