cutthroat trout

Fish, forests, and snow

You’re standing on a stream bank in your local mountain watershed. The sun is rising, warming the back of your head, and you see a fish drifting lazily in a still pool just off the rock you’re standing on. You peer closer, but with a flick of the tail it’s gone. You wonder if it…

abstracttwirl

Finding your science ‘voice’

I’ve just finished reading Terry Tempest Williams’ When Women Were Birds: Fifty-Four Variations on Voice. In it she talks about finding our voice – whether it’s out loud or on the page, alone or in a group of people. Williams’ book made me think about how scientists seem to think that voice is the terrain…

writingagain-3

Scientists on Twitter? Heresy!

My latest post for Canadian Science Publishing takes on the unexpectedly controversial topic of scientists using Twitter. “Recently, Kirk Englehardt, Director of Research Communication at the Georgia Institute of Technology, posted two hotly debated articles: one on why more university researchers aren’t tweeting, and a second on whether Twitter can make scientists better communicators. We…

tulips

What’s an environmental scientist to do?

Regular blog followers may have noticed that I haven’t written much about environmental issues lately. It’s not that I’ve stopped paying attention to them, but that their weight on my spirit was becoming almost unbearable. I felt burned out by the continuous bad environmental news coming from governments at all levels, and it hasn’t really…