LynxCkDevastation

Mountain Streams: Observing Differences

People who spend a lot of time around streams and rivers – fishing, kayaking, canoeing, or just being – know how to ‘read’ these watercourses, whether it’s to find the best fishing holes or to pick the best line to run a set of rapids. Even just to find the perfect spot where the rush…

b&w_farmacrossriver

S is for Snow

Of course I would pick snow as the ā€˜sā€™ word. Snow has been part of my vocabulary since I learned to talk. Growing up in northern Canada, we had snow days that heralded a much-welcome break from school, with snowball fights and snow shoveling (less exciting). We went cross-country skiing and snowshoeing, tobogganing and ice…

OleHagencartoon

M is for Mountain

Saturday started off fairly sunny and not too windy, a good day for the long drive west to the mountains. By the time we got our shit together, though, the clouds were rolling in and it was getting dark. But we thought what the hell and went for it anyway. Good thing we did. By…

storm_1

L is for Lag time

For the letter H, I posted about the hydrograph – a deceptively simple plot that represents the complex integration of the many processes that occur across a watershed to generate streamflow. Lag times are a key feature of hydrographs that help us better understand how a watershed functions. But let’s not limit ourselves to just…