Results of My Blogging Experiment

How my blogging experiment went, and how I plan to move forward based on the results.

Last week I decided I’d try and write a blog every day. I managed it for six days, starting on November 3 and ending today.

I had a lot more traffic on my blog, which makes sense since there was more to read. I enjoyed writing about the topics I covered (Saturday photo shot, crafting and creativity, women as STEM mentors, re-reading books, and mental illness does not equal a broken leg), and had some interesting comments both on the blog and via Twitter.

However, I felt like I was giving away ideas too quickly, burning through them at light speed. I also felt I wasn’t taking the time to think them through the way I usually do for my weekly Wednesday posts. That said, I did discover that I can write quickly and well when I need to – which I did with this experiment.

So the verdict is, more posts are better, and not all have to be in-depth. But to balance everyday life with online life, I will only write three posts a week: my usual Wednesday deep-dive, the Saturday shot for photography, and a Monday post around a key quote or book I’ve recently read.

Thanks to everyone for engaging over the past week with each of my daily blog posts – it’s been really fun. Especially the conversation over on Twitter about which books people re-read and why. I’ve learned about a number of books I’d never heard of!

Adios until Saturday’s photo shot!

Note: Today’s featured image is by jonny goldstein over on Flickr, CC-BY-2.0

 

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6 thoughts on “Results of My Blogging Experiment

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  2. Interesting!

    The first few years on my blog, I tried to put up a post and new artwork every Monday. Eventually, I stopped doing the exclusively Monday posts, and the Monday spike would still happen for at least another year, if I recall.

    There’s something good to be said for the slower, steady pace when blogging isn’t your full time job. Thoughtful posts often tend to have longer tails and garner more traffic over time, in my experience.

    • I like having a set day to put up posts, and from the emails I get people seem to like anticipating something in their inbox every Wednesday. Interesting that the spike still happened even when you stopped those posts. I do think that longer posts have a longer shelf life. Or maybe it’s just more thought-out posts that have that shelf life.

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